Hey there, Jersey Girl

Gem had a night out last Saturday night, meaning that once the kids were in bed I was on my own, something that doesn’t happen often, and left me with an interesting problem: what to do?

A quick scan through the TV listings revealed there was absolutely nothing on worth watching – it was Saturday night after all – so I raided the DVD cupboard and came up with a Kevin Smith double-bill of Chasing Amy and Jersey Girl. An unusual selection for me, as it barely featured Smith’s most famous creations, Jay and Silent Bob.

Chasing Amy, a story about a comic book artist who falls in love with a lesbian but ultimately can’t deal with her past, was every bit as good as I remembered it on the numerous occasions I’ve watched it in the past. Highly recommended.

Jersey Girl, released 10 years ago this month, was still in its cellophane wrapper, which tells me the only time I’d watched it was in the cinema. A rather different film for Smith, it’s a sweet tale of fatherhood starring Ben Affleck and Jennifer Lopez, at the time one of Hollywood’s most high profile couples. This wasn’t a good thing, however, as their previous collaboration, Gigli, was a box office flop and is still regarded as one of the worst movies of all time. Jersey Girl suffered by association, and reviews were rather mixed.

I remember thinking at the time that it was better than I’d expected, though, and I expected to like it ten years later. What I wasn’t expecting was to like it more than I had first time around, and I think that’s down to understanding the subject matter a lot more.

Affleck and Lopez start the movie as a high-flying couple living in New York City. All that changes about fifteen minutes in, when Lopez dies in childbirth, leaving Affleck to raise their daughter single-handed. At first he’s more interested in his career, dumping the baby on his dad (played by the great George Carlin), but an unfortunate incident at a Will Smith press conference changes all that, and slowly he embraces what it means to be a father, ultimately realising that raising his child is the most important thing in his life.

Now that I’m a father myself, I was able to relate to all of that much more. The scenes in the delivery room meant much more, as did those involving smelly babies. In short, I got it far more than I did first time round. And being able to relate more to the characters meant I was rooting for them more, which ultimately meant I enjoyed the movie more. So much so, when Gem got home, we ended up watching it again, together.

More often than not, re-watching something you loved in your youth is a disappointing experience. Dated visual effects, clunky dialogue and poor acting all seem to show up more when compared to old memories. So it was nice to see something that had improved with age.

Which makes me wonder… what else is hiding in the DVD cupboard, waiting to be rediscovered?

This autumn I'm running/cycling in a 30km duathlon and a half marathon, to raise money for Breast Cancer Campaign. You can read more about my challenge here or support me here. All donations, however big or small, gratefully received!